Drascombe Lugger Onkahye

Onkahye (Seminole Indian word for Dancing Feather), 1980 Drascombe Lugger from Honnor Marine, Devon, England

The family acquired Onkahye in 1982 from a friend, she had been imported from England to Houston and she home ported Corpus Christi, Texas. She is a yawl that has a sliding gunter rig, boomless main, and can float in a small puddle of dew. Capn Jack was the Master and Commander from 1982-1995 and the is the commanded by the Skipper now. She has sailed the waters of Corpus Christi Bay, Oceanside Harbor, Squaw Lake Reservoir (yes, she has sailed in the Arizona Desert), Lake Ray Roberts, Lake Worth, some tiny lake too small to have a name, Pensacola Bay and Santa Rosa Sound. She has her eye on the Outer Banks and Key Largo as well.


From Sailing

The Lugger was designed by John Watkinson after he got out of the boat business to suit his own requirements, which were in his own words:
1. "Ability to trail and for the family to handle on and off the trailer,
2. First rate sea-keeping qualities,
3. A good motor boat, for to start with, it was going to be a question of fishing and pottering under power,
4. I wanted the boat to be lively enough for me to enjoy a good hard sail once I had put the family on the beach."

He launched his first Lugger in 1965.

16 Sep 2013 Rigging A Lugger

We keep all of the sailing gear in the boat when it is stored in the garage. Some items get moved to the van when taking off for a road trip. Today we rigged in the driveway and launched from the neighbor's ramp.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

All our kids outgrew this life jacket so now it pulls duty as a road trip cushion for the main and mizzen, lashed down with one of the dock lines around the starboard stern cleat and traveller. We fly a couple of pennants, so now is the time to ship those.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The main is stowed in a side locker, the rudder and the motor ride on the cockpit sole, rudder is cushioned by an old towel.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Here is the rigging for the mainsheet.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The bumpkin gets shipped through the transom, sheet is clipped to the sail and bitter end led through hole in transom to jam cleat. We leave it retracted in case we spin the boat around at the dock, that prevents it from getting snapped off. We also drop in an electric motor, used to maneuver to and from the dock if wind conditions are not conducive to sailing to and from.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

We use one of our throwable cushions to protect the mast for trailering. It is secured with the dock line around the belaying pins.

We placed a silver dime at the base of the mast as a gift to the wind gods.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

When I rig the boat single handed, I step the mizzen first to get it out of the way and then step the mast. You have to raise the yard a little and make sure all the parell beads and rigging clear the thwart. Once the mast is up, I lash the base around the belaying pins with a sail tie to hold it in place while I secure the jib.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The jib connects to the furling drum, it is a job that requires 2 1/2 hands. The easy way is one person pushing the mast forward a little and holding out the jib while a second person pins the shackle into the furling drum. The cotter pin also has a retaining clip.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

The side stays are secured by taking a few turns through the fairleads in the cockpit and then throwing on a few half hitches.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Once the main mast is secure we like to raise the main without it being sheeted and get the halyard and downhaul sorted out. Then we lower the main, clip the clew to the sheet and stow it on the cockpit sole on the side farthest away from the dock. That way when we step in the boat from the dock we are not stepping on the sail.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Onkahye rigged and ready for the ramp.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Dropped the boat in, Skipper also handles Dock Wench duties, she keeps the boat calm while I get the trailer out of the water. Don't forget the drain plug!

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

Once in the water in the dock, we drop a little centerboard, put the motor down and ship the bumpkin. We motor out a bit and drop in the rudder, rails the sails and go for a cruise.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013

OnKaHyE and Cyane taking a break.

From Small Boat Restoration 2013


2012 Drascombe Lugger Onkahye (Dancing Feather) 2012 sailing Santa Rosa Sound


2013 Sailing Santa Rosa Sound Sailing Navarre, Santa Rosa Sound, April 2013 YouTube by Scott

1980-1996 Onkahye in Corpus Christi T Heads, her home port 1980-1996.

From Sailing

Lugger bow with roller reefing

From Sailing

Here's some of the gear needed for our day sail. Life jackets, tool kit with safety gear and registration, throwable cushions, battery for electric motor, spare lines, anchor, cooler, water jug and towels.

From Sailing

Dodge Grand Caravan had the towing duties. Lots of storage space! Honda Odyssey or Ford Edge have the honor now.

From Sailing

Ramp rigging

From Sailing

Gaff rigged yawl

From Sailing

Lugger galley

From Sailing

Trailer guides make launch and recovery a dream vs nightmare

From Sailing

Lugger dock crew. Token Chick handles the dock lines in addition to her Skipper duties, spins the boat around while I park the trailer. Guys are copying her, pretending to know what they are doing :) When I get back I lower the centerboard, slide the rudder in and ship the bumpkin.

From Sailing

Skipper lets brother turn a trick on the tiller

From Sailing

Keep the crew happy

From Sailing

Commodore and the Skipper

From Sailing

Lugger shows her Honnor Marine and Devon, England heritage

From Sailing

Skipper back to handling dock lines, she is a pro

From Sailing

Now they're posing

From Sailing


Webb Chiles, another Lugger fan, single handed Chidiock Tichborne out of San Diego across the Pacific and beyond, making it out into the Atlantic on his second circumnavigation before a rogue wave capsized the boat and the rig was lost. Webb is currently on another circumnavigation in a Moore 24 (Jan 2017).

From Sailing

From SBR 3: Jan 2014-

From SBR 3: Jan 2014-

Hanging out with the Daysailer and the Sunfish.

From SBR 3: Jan 2014-

Onkahye crossing Corpus Christi Bay 1995 with Capn Jack and the Skipper.

From SBR 4: Jun 2014 -

Onkahye sailing East Bay 2013.

From SBR 4: Jun 2014 -

26 Oct 16:

New trailer for Onkahye, frame and axle are dropped to lower the boat. Galvanized, trailer jack, spare, LED lights, guides, centerboard bunk. We will be able to launch her in some really skinny water now and she rides smooth on 13 inch radials now vs the 12 inch bias ply tires. Eddie English and his crew in Milton, Florida did a great job making the trailer frame and custom fitting all the accessories



06 Jun 17:

The Drascombe Association hosts an annual photo competition, a photo of Skipper and her Dad was a Runner Up. The photos were posted in the Summer 2017 Drascombe Association News number 121.



08 Jun 17:

Took the Lugger Onkahye out for a day sail, ran the motor and powered with the oars for a bit.

After we were done I shot a few pictures and video of how we have the boat set up.









Got buzzed by the US Navy's Blue Angels while we were out there.


to be continued....

2 comments:

  1. Thanks for sharing that Nice lugger! How do you like your electric pusher? Do you have a big battery, and is it easy enough to charge?

    Also, the furling gear looks new. How is that working for you?

    ReplyDelete
  2. The trolling motor works great, it has a 4 hour marine battery, very easy to charge. We also use the battery on our Daysailer. The motor would not push you into a heavy wind, but is good to get in and out of marinas and crowded boat ramps. The furling gear came with the boat, it has worked well since 1980. We sailed a lot without any motor and liked to use the jib to get in close to the dock, then be able to furl it quickly right before we landed.

    ReplyDelete